Let’s Say the Congress Got Subhas Chandra Bose Killed. Now What?

The ‘big explosive truth’ about Bose’s death, whatever it is, is useless for the common man. I absolutely support the idea that the truth about the case should come out – it’s much better than falsehood. But what after that?

Let’s say, hypothetically, the much hyped Bose files reveal that the Congress (or Nehru, the man everyone’s pointing a finger at) got Bose killed.

What do we do with this piece of information? Ditch the Congress and vote BJP in every election from now on – which is obviously what the BJP wants? Maybe even get the Congress banned?

Before we go there, we’ve got to deal with one small problem: the same Nehru, the same Congress, created the structure of the Indian nation today and wrote everything down in the Constitution. Oops, it’s is now poisoned!

If the Congress or Nehru indeed got Bose killed, wouldn’t it follow that there are criminal minds behind the Constitution of India? Shouldn’t we declare the Constituent Assembly’s work null and void and start all over again with people who have impeccable credentials?

The above would be the argument of those who take operational corruption really seriously and think that requires us to question the systems that operationally corrupt people built.

Mind you, that’s quite like what the BJP is doing today: they’re trying to expose operational corruption in the time of Nehru as a way of upholding their own ideology. But only, the BJP is not going the full distance. It doesn’t suffice to blame the congress. They need to blame the Constitution which the Congress created, too.

Be that as it may, my argument is different. I don’t give a damn about operational corruption as long as India’s primitive corruption thrives. I’m not worried about the book not being followed; I’m worried about the book being followed – because when it’s followed, primitive corruption thrives.

I don’t care if Nehru got Bose killed. Maybe he did, maybe he didn’t. It’s a useless piece of information because the real problem in India is not who runs the show but what show is run. That’s why I find it stupid for people to base their vote on how Bose or Gandhi or whoever-it-is died.

What show is run depends on the Constitution of India. I want it rewritten from scratch because the show has serious problems. Not because its creators could potentially have indulged in operational corruption, but because India’s primitive corruption has gotten into it all by itself. There’s no way it couldn’t have gotten there, whether the people involved were operationally corrupt or not.

Therefore, I’d like votes to be cast based on who can get the Constitution rewritten from scratch, today. Not based on how someone died ages ago, even if that someone is a tall figure like Subhas Chandra Bose.

The Constitution needs rewriting for the simple reason that it mishandles India’s diversity, notably of the linguistic kind, and makes the Aryan Pyramid of Corruption thrive all over India. This is the real issue in India, and it’s a problem when politicians and the media take attention away from it.

From this perspective, the ‘big explosive truth’ about Bose’s death, whatever it is, is useless for the common man. I absolutely support the idea that the truth about the case should come out – it’s much better than falsehood. But what after that?

AAP and the limits of expansionism

Why did AAP win Delhi? Can AAP do to the rest of India what it did to Delhi?

Among many answers to the first question, one must stand out as important: the party had its ears to the ground, i.e., it spent most of its time listening to those at the bottom of the pyramid of power instead of imposing the images and words of supermen from above. That they didn’t have any supermen in the first place helped them become popular with laypeople, providing them an impression of flatness of organization and ideology. Everyone, it appeared, was welcome to AAP as long as they weren’t with “the bad guys”.

But organizational and ideological flatness within AAP is a myth. It was stated in exactly these terms by some, who left the party, but one doesn’t need a proof for it; it’s a truism. Any well-run political party must have a command and control structure, and those who command and control must, in a well-known hierarchy, be above those who are commanded and controlled.

When the organization isn’t large enough, hierarchy doesn’t come in the way of its being close to the ground: the voices from below reach the top because the top isn’t too high up in the air.

Why am I bringing this up? I’m bringing this up to answer my second question above, as to whether AAP can do a Delhi with all of India. AAP’s relative flatness compared to BJP and Congress, which was good enough for the geographically insignificant area of Delhi, is not scalable as it tries to “go national”. Localness isn’t expandable from one locus.

For starters, the very name of the party is in a foreign language for most of India: Hindi. The language of Delhi, it is considered a dangerous threat to liberty in South and East India; there aren’t any Aam Aadmis there to begin with; that’s an alien expression. The actual Aam Aadmi, who speaks an Indo-Aryan language like Hindi, is not exactly welcome in South or East India because he comes to replace the native Dravidian or Tibeto-Burman, to colonize.

No successful organization, because of its inevitable hierarchy, can maintain even an impression of flatness when it expands beyond a certain size, or beyond certain natural boundaries such as those of language and ethnicity as discussed above.

The Congress and the BJP have mastered the art, of not even putting up a facade of flatness, in “going national”. They essentially operate without the advantage which AAP had in this Delhi victory, and they’re not apologetic about it. In fact, they want the peoples of India to apologize for being diverse and making it difficult for them to keep their ears to the ground.

AAP’s fate will be no different as it tries to expand beyond Delhi. Aloofness from the ground is in the very nature of expansionism. I’m not saying this to cast my vote in favor of the BJP or the Congress. Far from it, I am saying this to forewarn the peoples of India against falling for another national party to rule over them thinking it will be fundamentally different from the existing ones. The thing to learn from AAP is that localness is the way forward, and this naturally requires rejecting AAP everywhere outside Delhi.

 

[First published: IBNLIVE, 11-02-2015]